Literaryterms.net

When & How To Use Setting | LiteraryTerms.net

When to use Setting. Setting should be used whenever a story begins, has a change in the events, or readers need information to understand characters ’ actions. Setting is also used to create a mood (making the reader or viewer feel an emotion). Mystery stories may keep the setting hidden to keep readers guessing.

Actived: Thursday Jan 1, 1970

View Details Literaryterms.net

Chiasmus: Definitions and Examples | LiteraryTerms.net

Posted: (52 years ago) Chiasmus comes from a Greek word meaning “crossed,” and it refers to a grammatical structure that inverts a previous phrase. That is, you say one thing, and then you say something very similar, but flipped around. For example: Chiasmus usually occurs on the sentence level, but can also be found in much broader structures – that is, you might have a paragraph that talks about a town, a state, a country, and the world, then goes back down in reverse order at the end. However, these structures are much harde…

Pet View Details

Setting: Definition and Examples | LiteraryTerms.net

Posted: (52 years ago) Setting is the time and place (or when and where) of the story. It’s a literary element of literature used in novels, short stories, plays, films, etc., and usually introduced during the exposition (beginning) of the story, along with the characters. The setting may also include the environment of the story, which can be made up of the physical location, climate, weather, or social and cultural surroundings. There are various ways that time and place indicate setting. Time can cover many areas, such as the character’s t…

Film View Details

Plot: Definition and Examples | LiteraryTerms.net

Posted: (52 years ago) In a narrative or creative writing, a plot is the sequence of events that make up a story, whether it’s told, written, filmed, or sung. The plot is the story, and more specifically, how the story develops, unfolds, and moves in time. Plots are typically made up of five main elements: 1. Exposition: At the beginning of the story, characters, setting, and the main conflict are typically introduced. 2. Rising Action: The main character is in crisis and events leading up to facing the conflict begin to unfold. The story becomes co…

Film View Details

Enthymeme: Definition and Examples | LiteraryTerms.net

Posted: (52 years ago) An enthymeme (pronounced EN-thuh-meem) is a kind of syllogism, or logical deduction, in which one of the premisesis unstated. A syllogismis a logical deduction from two premises. The classic example goes like this: 1. All men are mortal 2. Socrates is a man 3. Therefore, Socrates is mortal #1 and #2 are the premises. #3 is the conclusion. To turn this into an enthymeme, just remove one of the premises (#1 or #2). Once you do that, you’ll see that the argument still makes sense (after all, no one would doubt the t…

Pet View Details

Fantasy: Definition and Examples | Literary Terms

Posted: (52 years ago)

Pet View Details

Appositive: Definition and Examples | LiteraryTerms

Posted: (52 years ago)

Pet View Details

Ode: Definition and Examples | LiteraryTerms.net

Posted: (52 years ago) The word “ode” has two separate definitions, one stricter and one looser. In the strict definition, an ode is a classical poem that has a specific structure and is aimed at an object or person. In this sense, odes usually express elevated emotion, and are often used to praise a leader or a work of art. In the loose definition, an ode is any work of art or literature that expresses high praise. This could include a best man’s speech praising the groom, or an emotional eulogy at someone’s funeral. In formal contexts, it’s …

Pet View Details

Soliloquy: Definitions and Examples | LiteraryTerms.net

Posted: (52 years ago) A soliloquy (pronounced so-LILL-oh-kwee) is a kind of monologue, or an extended speech by one character. In a soliloquy, though, the speech is not given to another character, and there is no one around to hear it. Instead of another character, the soliloquy is delivered to a surrogate, to the audience, or to no one in particular.

Pet View Details

When and How to Write an Anecdote | LiteraryTerms.net

Posted: (52 years ago) For example, the very first words of a character’s speech are that he owns a pet monkey, which will be the subject of the talk: this is not an anecdote. Later, however, he tells the audience a story about how he once taught the monkey to make a sandwich: this is an anecdote. When to Use an Anecdote

Pet View Details

Connotation: Definitions and Examples | LiteraryTerms.net

Posted: (52 years ago) A connotation is a feeling or idea that a word has, in addition to its literal or main meaning (the denotation). Often, a series of words can have the same basic definitions, but completely different connotations—these are the emotions or meanings implied by a word, phrase, or thing. For example, “This clothing is affordable!” versus “This clothing is cheap!” Here, “affordable” sounds much better than “cheap,” because the word cheap also implies low quality.

Pet View Details

Persuasive Essay | Literary Terms

Posted: (52 years ago) Which animal makes the best pet; Whether or not to support plans for the new highway; Should people ride bicycles without a helmet; How should we raise money for our project . b. Stance: The stance of a persuasive essay is the side of the issue that the author supports. The stance should be stated strongly and clearly so that there is no doubt ...

Pet View Details

Epithet: Definition and Examples | LiteraryTerms.net

Posted: (52 years ago) A girl’s name is Marilynn, but her parents call her Lynn. Her sister calls her Mary. And her friends call her Merry-go-round when she’s being silly. Lynn, Mary, and Merry-go-round are all epithets, or special nicknames that replace the name of a person and often describe them in some way. Epithet (pronounced ep–uh-thet) is derived from the Greek phrase epitithenai, meaning “to add” or “to put on.”

Pet View Details

When & How to Write an Encomium | Literary Terms

Posted: (52 years ago) How to Write an Encomium. Pick an object. Ideally, it should be something that you have really strong positive feelings for – a romantic partner is the obvious option, but you can also write an encomium to a parent, a leader, a city you especially love, even a pet! Also, don’t overlook the option of writing about something you don’t have strong feelings for – or even something you ...

Pet View Details

Plot Twist: Definition and Examples | Literary Terms

Posted: (52 years ago)

Pet View Details

Plot Quiz | LiteraryTerms.net

Posted: (52 years ago) The literary term, Plot, is covered in this multiple choice quiz. Please review the definition and examples before you complete the Plot quiz.

Pet View Details

Innuendo: Definition and Examples | LiteraryTerms.net

Posted: (52 years ago) An innuendo (pronounced in-yu-EN-do) is when you say something which is polite and innocent on the surface, but indirectly hints at an insult or rude comment, a dirty joke, or even social or political criticism. Innuendos are commonly used in everyday conversation as a socially acceptable way to be critical, mean, sexual, humorous, or even flirtatious. The word innuendo comes from the Latin phrase innuere meaning to “make a sign to” or “nod to.”

Pet View Details

Antonomasia: Definition and Examples | LiteraryTerms.net

Posted: (52 years ago) Antonomasia (pronounced an-tuh-nuh–mey-zhuh) is a literary term in which a descriptive phrase replaces a person’s name. Antonomasia can range from lighthearted nicknames to epic names. The phrase antonomasia is derived from the Greek phrase antonomazeinmeaning “to name differently.”

Pet View Details